Intermission Hair Talk: John Frieda Frizz Ease Original 6 Effects Serum

It has been a while since my last post and I do owe you all an application post on those Tom Ford lipsticks but today I would like to talk about the John Frieda Frizz Ease Original 6 Effects Serum.

I came to examining hair products that I use when I decided to bleach my hair twice and commit to a life to dry, lifeless, chemically damaged but blond hair. I could not afford to get it done in a salon thus I did the bleaching and toning myself, leaving time between each process to try and not fry or melt my already weak and fine hair. I might share my process someday but that is for another post.

I was quite turned off by the tangly, rough texture of my hair and thus begun applying various masks, ampoules, hair mists, oils and serums on my hair, testing which combination is the most efficient and healthy when I came across this old bottle of John Frieda Frizz Ease Serum. I had used this serum in minute amounts in the past but it had fell out of favour as I never really enjoyed the strangely smooth texture that remains on my hands after application that is extremely difficult to wash off. I kept the bottle around and used it occasionally when I wanted my hair to be more shiny and smooth. It does work quite well in improving the touch feel of the hair, however, I have always felt a slight itch on my scalp when I used it and didn’t enjoy having it being transferred onto my skin from then ends of my hair. I had success with applying it recently before I decided to bleach my hair and thought it would work well to help my bleached hair, it did say “smoothes” and “hydrates” on the bottle after all.

However, I attempted applying this serum on the ends of my hair a day after my second bleaching session when my hair was extremely dry. Aside from the chemical processes, I also had naturally curly hair, thus I really needed a hair serum to smoothen it all out. I sprayed hair mist on my hair, then applied the Frizz Ease serum and waited for my hair to air dry. Unfortunately, instead of restoring my hair’s natural curl and giving it some shine, my hair became somewhat straightened and was frizzy instead of shiny. Some parts of my hair even felt a tiny bit crunchy. Thus, facing such abnormalities, I decided to investigate.

John Frieda Frizz Ease Original 6 Effects Serum Ingredients List:
Cyclopentasiloxane, Dimethiconol, Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate, Paraffinum Liquidum, Hydrolyzed Silk, Parfum, Linalool, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Limonene.

(Source: https://www.johnfrieda.com/en-SG/products/frizz-ease/serum-for-frizzy-hair/)

Before I checked the ingredients, I already had a feeling that silicones were part of this product solely because of the unusually smooth texture and coating on the skin that I can feel when I use it. It is very much similar to those silicone containing pore-filling primers that are used on the skin. Furthermore, I am aware that some hair masks that I use do contain silicone as their 3rd or 4th ingredient and many makeup products contain them too.

However, my beef with this product is that the very first 2 ingredients are silicone. Meaning, instead of a water or oil base where a smaller amount of silicone is swimming in, for this product, there is a small amount of oils (or other stuff) swimming in a big pool of silicone. I was then even more concerned when I did a little research and found that both cyclopentasiloxane and dimethiconol are prone to build up due to their waterproof nature, making them difficult to remove without a strong shampoo. (Source: https://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/kinky-hair-type-4a/silicones-good-bad-the-ugly)  I don’t have a huge issue with its removal as I am not one who doesn’t wash her hair for days due to living in the tropics, but I have an issue with a product that claims hydration when in fact you are just applying silicon on your hair, coating it to make it seem smooth but not actually providing much real hydration or nourishment, especially in my case with my hair now being chemically processed.

The other ingredients didn’t quite make up for the pool of silicone either. Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate is an organic compound, used also in lipbalms and sunscreen. Usually it is mixed with other compounds to form sunscreen, but in this case I am guessing that it is probably just a mixing media. Paraffinum liquidum is liquid paraffin which is basically mineral oil that forms a coating on the surface. There is hydrolyzed silk added in the mix which contains proteins for the hair but it is a wonder if any of it really gets in the hair while being suspended in a soup of silicones and mineral oil that coats and seals off the hair.

It suddenly all made sense to me why my scalp felt uncomfortable when I used this product and why my curls weren’t returning. It did nothing for my hair. All it did was coat my unhealthy, dry hair and weighed it down.

And so I had to try something else and find out if it was truly the product or I had fried my hair beyond salvation. I had a small bottle of Tarte’s Maracuja Oil sitting around from an old Ipsy bag as my face just doesn’t bode well with oil. I went in with my hair mist after washing my hair and applied the oil quite generously.

Curls and shine back after using Tarte’s Maracuja Oil on my twice bleached hair.

The difference was clear. While it air dried, my curls returned and my hair had some of its shine back again. My hair didn’t feel oily as a lot of the product seemed to have been absorbed. I decided to check what’s in this product and as expected, it made perfect sense.

Tarte Maracuja Oil Ingredients
Passiflora Edulis Seed Oil, Tocopherol

(Source: https://tartecosmetics.com/en_SG/skincare/maracuja-oil/342.html)

It was a simple product containing the said oil and Tocopherol, which was vitamin E, a clinically proven ingredient that moisturises. No silicones, no slippery feel, no strange crunchy hair, just simple oil and vitamin.

I don’t really want to condemn a product as it may work for other people, but the John Frieda Frizz Ease Original 6 Effects Serum is just a bad product. It does not add to the health of your hair but instead just coats it to create the illusion that your health is healthier. I don’t understand how it claims to be an “award-winning” formula. Perhaps it is meant to create an immediate illusion of good hair texture for styling but it seems to be damaging when used in the long run. Furthermore, from my personal experience, it did not do much to smooth out my chemically treated hair. On the other hand, a simple natural oil that contained only two ingredients was able to restore my hair and is probably healthier in the long run. The difference is night and day. I rest my case.

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